Chinese Numbers by Lucy Chau Lai-Tuen

ChineseNumbers2Dover 58
An airtight coffin
Each lifeless corpse had once held onto a breath of hope
A wish for a better life
Suffocated by greed
Was that a dream too far?
Morecambe bay 21
The devils beach
Pitch black, desperate, they waited in vain
The rushing tide unfurling,
Death a rippling length of silk flowing, fluttering, falling, covering
Their stooped work aching bodies
Pingfan 3,000 to 12,000 human experiments
Catalogued, examined from a safe distance
Prostitutes for war
Women for comfort some barely past their teens
Military sex-slaves
20,000 probably more, we may never know
Unit 731, 1644 and 100
10,000
or more plague infested bags of flesh
Ravaged by untreated venereal diseases
400,000 living corpses consumed
by Cholera, anthrax and Tularemia, unleashed from a lab
Man indeed had become death

©Lucy Chau Lai-Tuen 2014

Blame it on the critters

Lucy Sheen aka 4gottenadoptee:

Check this artist’s blog out folks

Originally posted on beastlyworlds:

bin tired

  Sorry for the not very frequent posts…. I’ve been drawing, but mostly I bin tired.

little stress beast postit

I’d like to blame it on these little post-it note stress critters – but really it’s just been a full time. A good time, but I’d like it to be filled with more drawing and painting!

coffee critter postit

I keep aiming for the space of the weekend to hold lots of pen and brush times… maybe this weekend I will succeed more fully, with more coffee.

Hope you’ve had a good week, and have a brilliant weekend!

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An Open Letter To Trevor Philips: Why Your Documentary Is Logically and Morally Flawed.

Originally posted on Media Diversified:

by Ahmed Olayinka Sule

When I first heard that you would be presenting a documentary on Channel Four titled, “Things We Can’t Say About Race That Are True”, I was keen to know what you had to say. Even though I was concerned about what was reported in the media about the documentary before it was aired, I decided to hold my peace. Having watched the documentary on 19 of March 2015, now is the time for me to let you know what is on my mind.

I guess you must be pleased with yourself having ignited a fierce debate on race. You must also feel a sense of triumph that you have “unearthed” some new insights into race relations. There is no doubt that you have played a prominent role in race relations in modern day Britain. From serving as chair of Runnymede Trust to heading the Commission for…

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Equity as a Trade Union is the priority representing its entire workforce or safe-guarding artistic licence?

Paul Hyu has just written and extremely thought-provoking (some might say controversial) article regarding Equity and their British East Asian actor members.

You see, Equity follows a Policy, for which we, the BAME members, are apparently responsible.  If that Policy doesn’t translate into Equity being able to act in a way to support and protect us from being excluded, then we, the “Minority Ethnic Members Committee”, have to change it.   We shouldn’t expect non-BAME or majority ethnic (aka white) actors to do it for us.  But here is the rub:  it’s not easy to do.

To reads the full article please click here

 

This is my initial response as an actor, a British actor who happens to be EAST ASIAN

This is a huge problem, which is has now become “historical” much as the cutting of sheet metal to particular size in the 70s, and 80s. It was always cut a particular size because it had always been done that way. In spite of the huge amount of waste and until someone had the courage and common sense to challenge the “it’s done this way because we’ve always done it this way” and asked the question WHY things would never have changed. So it is, I feel with Equity. It’s always been this way, so we’ll continue to do things this way.
Artistic license to me is mounting a production of the Tempest and setting in the Chinese Celestial Court, or casting Adrian Lester as an English King. One could argue that casting a Black actor as an English King allows the production to explore deeper the political and socio-economic themes of this piece in a more modern context. Or is it just about accepting the society and the culture that we live in today in 21st century Britain and getting on with it and casting whomever we like in the productions that we want?
Allowing a theatre, film or TV or radio production to cast a White actor as an East Asian character in the 21st century, does not in my mind enhance any production. An in terms of the modern context of equality and employment legislation – how can this be?
Thirty years ago the situation was very different, when I graduated there were just six East Asian actors registered with Equity as actors and on Spotlight again classified as actors. And I was one of them. There are now plenty of East Asian actors. So the matter of not being able to find an East Asian actor is a moot point. To those who complain that it’s tough to find East Asian actors and that they don’t know where, and that they’ve resorted to having to pull people of the streets; I’d say isn’t that part of your remit to know where and how you source your talent? That relying on Spotlight and the personal managements and agents isn’t enough? Yes everyone is pushed for time, everyone is trying to squeeze out of their budgets as much as they can – but trying to apportion some kind of onus on the artists for not being found in the “usual places” seems a tad odd to me. Perhaps they cannot be found in the usual places because they have not, as yet had the opportunities that will allow them to employ a regular agent or have the credits required for an entry into Spotlight?There are plenty of organisations out there, even a google search could put Casting Directors in touch either directly or indirectly with the wealth of East Asian talent that is now available. Numbers as far as I am concerned is not a valid argument as it was when I first became an actor. Artistic license should not be used as a cover all, a euphemism for racist behaviour – but essential this is what it is, and it’s happening to British East Asian Artists who are, who have been consistently denied the opportunities to participate in the making and representation of their own history and their own stories. In a modern poly ethnic and multicultural society one would think that the casting an East Asian in any non-specified role should be the norm. But it is not. The programs or the productions that do cast East Asian actors seem to, have to have an overt East Asian theme. Usually one that involves characters who are not indigenous to these shore. In other words ‘Overseas East Asians, students, immigrants, usually illegal. I very rarely see British East Asians. The representations we see are victims of crime because of the way that we look and the foreign accents that we have. People fleeing from a terrible past (true this does occur) but I think that I need only count on one hand the instances that I have seen on UK TV a fully rounded representation of a British East Asian (without foreign accent). By the way I do have an accent, just not the one that many casting directors and producers think that I should have!
For those that say (and there are plenty of them out there) that Yellowface/Yellowvoice is nowhere near as repugnant as Blacking up or Brown face, I’ve even had people in person trying to make a case that Yellowface is a form of benign micky-taking and actually comes from a place of fondness; from one who is East Asian I assure you it engenders precisely the same gut wrenching feelings when exposed to this type of ‘behaviour’. To clarify further calling an East Asian a CHINK, CHING-CHONG or any other such derivative is to this East Asian just as abhorrent and insulting as using the “N” word to a person who is Black, African or Caribbean or the “P” word to a South Asian. It carries the negative weight and remembrance of colonial atrocities, indentured labour and suffering and the brutal inhumane treatment that many East Asians were subject to. As well as the more subtle and equally as damaging structural and institutionalised racism many East Asians encountered – still encounter to this day.
Yes times have moved on, but have the hearts and minds of the wider society also moved on at the same pace? It would appear from where I’m standing that a considerable number of hearts and minds need to catch up.As long as those who sit in power on the top table of my union. Yes my union. I pay my subs like a good little member, as long as those people continue to think in the manner that they appear to be doing the union will never be able to advocate and fight for the rights of ALL of its members. A trade Union should be looking after the interests of ALL its members. This is one member that feels as if my interests in the work place are being ignored.Equity should be part of the solution not part of the ongoing and continued cultural and artistic ‘blockade’ that sees East Asian artists and artists of colour, duel or tri-heritage, side barred and essentially squeezed out onto the fringes of mainstream British culture. All this talk of diversity and inclusion is great, but let’s first get our own house in order.