Reflecting as current Acting Job draws to an end

When acting jobs draw to and end it’s always sad.

Sandra Oh
But it’s part and parcel of the peripatetic life of a freelancer. You make new friends and now with social media, you can keep in contact (although it’s not the same, but better than losing touch). Recently and more to the point unusually for me; I have been incredibly lucky in the recent work I’ve been given the opportunity to do. Neal Street Productions, Royal Shakespeare Company, BBC, Big Finish Productions, Theatre503, HerStory Festival, Women and War Festival and Untold Arts #TheScarTest at Soho Theatre. But even in the 21st century, such productions as #SnowInMidsummer (RSC) and #TheScarTest are rare. Rare because of the content/subject matter and casting. #Snow an all East Asian eleven strong cast, #Scar an all female, all women of colour cast – hired to act, not just because of the colour of their skin, but their ability to perform multiple roles.
I’d like to think that we come a long way since the 80’s when I played Portia (amongst other roles) at The Bristol Old Vic in the studio.

Julius Caesar BOV 1987
Lucy Sheen and Leo Wringer as Portia and Brutus photographer Lawrence Burns

Directed by the late great Roger Rees. One broad sheet critic headed their review

 Let Me Have Men About me that are Black.

His contention was that no matter how well the diverse poly ethnic company spoke the verse and he conceded we spoke it perfectly. It just wasn’t Shakespeare, because we were not white. I repeat I’d like to think we have come a long way since then. I can dream can’t I? But then I think it’s been thirty years since that groundbreaking production. And we have yet to see another British East Asian actress in a major Shakespearian role on a main-stage in the UK. Incredible isn’t it.

Whilst our colleagues of South Asian and Black, African and Caribbean heritage have made headway – British East Asians remain stuck in a time vortex which is more reminiscent of the Victorian world view when it comes to people from the Far-east than the actuality of the 21st century. But is this then a true reflection of how the western, Eurocentric Caucasian Oxbridge educated male arts dominated world view us?

Diversity is the watchword and those in the industry sitting in their ivory towers, holding the purse strings tight, dictating what is “good art” and what subjects are worthy of being produced and who can or cannot be cast in leading protagonistic roles. But inclusivity the actual driver, the engine if you like to achieve diversity top to bottom, in front of and behind the camera that is missing. We can have all the protestations from the production companies that they see diversity as something that is lacking. That they need to do more. But if the will to drive this to fruition is not there. If the very people tasked with implementing this have no connection to diversity what then? And it isn’t just the media (TV, Film) that is guilty of paying lip service only it is in our theatres. On our main stages, not just regional subsidises theatres (the few that are left) but our major NPOs (National portfolio Organisations) i.e. the ones that receive ongoing funding from The Arts Council Of England, some not all are still lagging far behind in the diversity. In casting of actors, back stage, administration wise etc.

When are we going to see more diversity and inclusion in British culture?
And please don’t tell me it takes time for these things to occur. It’s been thirty years since I first entered in to the fray and heard the “debate” about accurate and appropriate representations of people of colour. How much more time is needed? Quite frankly that “excuse” has passed its sell by date and gone over the “best before” date.

All I want, all any actor wants (irrespective colour, gender or physical ability) is a fair shake. An opportunity to work in the field that I trained to work in. I think I’m ok at this type of work. All anyone wants is to be able to make the bills at the end of the month, to earn enough to cover their travel and food costs and maybe have just a little at the end of the month to have a few nights out – go see a film, catch a theatre show have a drink or meal with a few friends once in a while. As an actor of colour I’d love not to be worrying
about the when the next casting will come along let alone the next job. At the moment many acting jobs appear to be driven not by the talent,  but by who your agent is and whether the production company and or casting director actually knows and likes the agent you’re with. You’re being dictated to before you even get a chance to walk through a door to a casting. You add the latter to the existing narrow view when casting people of colour in non-specified roles, add that to the ongoing view of what an East Asian should be, the limited expectations of what an East Asian should be like through the culturally dominant lens of the UK and castings are not piling up for actors like me. Add to that the inbuilt agism when it comes to female actors and that’s yet another barrier. Whatever happened to “playing age” especially in theatre?

I’m not famous, people don’t know who I am or what I’ve been in. That’s fine, I don’t mind that at all. But industry people? You would be forgiven for assuming that those who work in the business of finding or suggesting actors for roles, that such professionals would be in the know. It’s not like I’m fresh out of drama school.  I have to confess I have now been around for a while and I do have a fairly credible CV.  But recently I have been quizzed by several industry folks in the casting sector,  asking me why they have never heard of me, or never come across me.
I don’t know, how does one answer that one?  At the beginning of this year I appeared in Call The Midwife S6 Ep3 an episode that apparently attracted 31.4 per cent of the viewing audience and 500,000 more viewers than the previous week’s episode. So over or around 9.22 million viewers. Making Call The Midwife the most watched program for that day.

As an actor of colour or a very particular and unrepresented colour roles of this type, calibre, researched well and crafted with love and care are the exception not the rule.

And on that note I will draw to a rather (for me) depressing note. As I enter the final few performances of The Scar Test and extraordinary play written by the über talented Hannah Khalil, directed superbly by Sara Joyce and performed by an equally extraordinary cast Nadia Nadif, Shazia Nicholls, Janet Etuck and Rebecca Omogbehin I cannot help wonder whether we will ever get the chance to work together again because this grouping of actress spanning continents, faiths and cultures is so rare to be seen on stage yet it is an actuality in British  life in spite of what the Daily Mail and other right-wing fear and hatred mongering media would have you think. Britain is not as segregated and fearful as some would want us to believe.
Yet our art, our culture has not even come close to reflecting the exuberance, the complexity, the joy and diversity that really is modern-day Britain and we are all the poorer for it.

 

 

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Matt Trueman: Are we faced with a drought of new playwrights?

My view on this article is a pretty panoramic view (and yes thank you to the various conservative administrations, both central and regional over the years the arts sector has been decimated by their ingrained philistine view).

The nub of the problem is that we continue to have to deal with strata of arts arbiters, purse string holders, gatekeepers, commissioners etc who are majorly white, male and Oxbridge educated. Many have bought into, associate themselves with, subscribe to “diversity” but that is just not good enough. Diversity might be the gate which the arts sector has finally opened but inclusion is the key that will open the inner sanctum. And that key is still firmly in the grasp of those (many of whom) have no idea what it means to be a twenty-first-century British person. What identity and culture is for modern Britishers. We are fed a predominantly, mono-tonal cultural diet, especially on the small and large screen. Even on our stages colour continues to be divisive instead of inclusive. Until such time that ALL NPO, funded theatre companies start to embrace every aspect of diversity; which means substantive inclusion, engagement and active development then the drought and dearth of British writers and the diversity that they can bring to the stage will continue to elude us all. It will continue to feed into the lack of diversity on our stages when it comes to casting BAME actors in protagonistic roles. We will continue to see plays written by writers about subjects and themes that they are not personally or intimately connected to.
Now a writer can write about whatever he or she wants. But hearing the crafted words from an East Asian about the historical injustices suffered by say a Chinese serving in the British Chinese Labour Corps is not the same as a play penned by a well researched white writer – it just isn’t. It also allows for the continuation of cultural appropriation, using cultures merely as coat racks from which to hang a piece. Where foreignness and culture become a set dressing. It condones and enables (some) organisations to justify Yellowface and Yellow-voice. And it carves an even deeper path and precedent for only certain writers (usually not of colour) to be the only ones that can write historical costume dramas.
I get it you can’t just let loose an untried and untested writer. There are plenty of BAME writers out there. The ones that have made it, in my honest opinion, are not celebrated or performed as much as they should be by our nationally funded theatres. There are others just teetering on the cusp and unlike their white colleagues, many of us BAME writers don’t get the break or the backing to move onto the next rung. I see much new writing and I have to question how did xxx manage to get funding when xxx was much better or more worthy. Yes, it is subjective but hell surely those in the literary departments can tell good writing from bad? Pieces that have potential and those that don’t – maybe not.
At the end of the day until organisations, venues, theatres, producers, purse holders, funders and gatekeepers actually substantively embrace diversity, actively invite writers from under-represented sections of British society (BAME – East Asian, Women over 50, disabled, transgender) nurture them, invest in them i.e. pay them, commission them; no more endless scratch and R&D, but actual projection and goals into full professional production. Then and only then will we start to see the real diversity, the real cornucopia of writing that modern multicultural, poly ethnic Britain has to offer.

Saying goodbye to 2016

It is at this time, most people reflect on the events of the year, whilst also looking towards to the future.

As a female, as a British East Asian what does 2017 hold in store? With everything that has gone on recently across the globe and the shift in not just national and international politics. Where do I stand? Where do I place myself in a new Britain that is now seemingly blindly shuffling its way towards – towards what we don’t quite know do we?

America a country that I have always loved, will this country now allow me to enter it freely?

 Central Europe is in the grip of its own doubt, grappling with the ideal, but having to face some of the grim realities that free unfettered movement can enable.

And Britain, 
“…this scepter’d isle,
This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars,
This other Eden, demi-paradise,
This fortress built by Nature for herself
Against infection and the hand of war,
This happy breed of men, this little world,
This precious stone set in the silver sea,
Which serves it in the office of a wall,
Or as a moat defensive to a house,
Against the envy of less happier lands,
This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.
Richard II, Act 2 (Shakespeare)

Has shown itself to be less than a paradise .and not as blessed a refuge as perhaps was once thought. Brexit has scratched the country’s surface and our collective mindset and what we have uncovered is that the dark, unsavoury and toxic ideals of the extreme right have never really left us. 
Britain is not alone in this “discovery.” 

I feel fearful. Not of being dragged from my bed in the dead of night but I am fearful that the spread of this below the line extreme right consciousness will  inveigle itself once more into our institutions and national structures. I hope that I am just being paranoid and overly anxious.
I am not a politician or an academic. I’m an actor, a writer, filmmaker and when needs be, a bit mouthy about issues that I feel passionate about. 
As a person of colour, as a disenfranchised culturally dislocated and isolated person I am finding it more and more difficult to see how I fit into Britain.
The social and cultural progressions that have been made since the late 50s early 60s when I first landed in this country as Hong Kong Chinese foundling, have been truly remarkable. The diversity and variety that can be seen, heard and experienced in most major cities and towns across the land is the jewel in Britain’s crown.

 So why do I still feel excluded from British society?
Quite simply because I seldom see myself represented in my own culture – British culture.
And as a professional artist, it is rare that I even get the chance to be considered to represent my own ethnicity, let alone see the Britain that I grew up in, recreated on TV, film or in the theatre.

 In April 2013, I did a presentation on the unrealistic artistic mirrors that I was faced with in the media as I grew up during the 60s. It was part of IN CONVERSATION – A Snapshot of Chinese Cinema Today.

More Light 2009

More Light Arcola Theatre 2009


Whilst there have been great strides forwards for British East Asians (though to be fair we lag far behind colleagues from other British minority ethnic groups). 

We still have not been able to break through the entrenched, almost subliminally embedded Victorian perspective of what an East Asian should be. In spite of several high-profile production since 2013 that have had a majority or completely all British East Asians in the cast.

On the small and big screens in the UK, British East Asians are hardly to be seen at all. 
Now when I say British East Asian, what I mean is roles and story lines that don’t cast East Asians as the outsiders, the immigrants, speaking English with a heavy accent. Roles that see East Asians as British. The girls next door, the cabbie, the Doctor or the local shop owner. 

We are far from being there. The casting controversy that The Print Room, a fringe theatre in West London find itself in, is testament to that. We will see on stage, in 2017, a production being done in Yellowface.

So for those that may have stumbled across this blog and be wondering what on earth I’m on about. Why the hell am I complaining about not being included, I should be grateful that I live where I do – yes I am lucky that I live where I do. 
But that’s part of the “problem” isn’t. Here we are in the 21st Century Britain a group of British citizens has been edited out of British society and culture. To the point that we are not even able to participate in the re-telling of our own story (fictional or factual).

We are neither British nor in some cases East Asian. Relegated to cultural servitude. As coat hangers upon which others, many of whom see themselves as the innovators of art; and are by and large the dominant group in society. They dangle and exhibit their artistry, from our history and cultural lineage, exploiting us, but in the same breath deny us access and any hope of participating in our own culture.

Whether it is ridiculous fancy dress costumes,

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or stereotypical TV/Film roles being portrayed by white actors

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Janette Tough as Japanese fashion designer Huki Mukin in the Ab Fab movie

Take a moment and think.

Would you be happy constantly being depicted, in the media and on stage as

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or

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No matter what the drama 

Add to this the representation of these White British stereotypes are only portrayed by Black or Asian actors never, or seldom, a white actor, wouldn’t you begin to question your place in British society?
Never seeing an East Asian as a protagonist in any drama. Even when they do appear they are  portrayed as a white person. White people stripped down to a basic racial and cultural cliché. Not once, twice but every single time you turn on your TV or go to the cinema, rent a DVD, stream a new TV drama, or listen to a radio play 

Wouldn’t you begin to feel ever so slightly irked. Imagine how you might feel after thirty or forty years of this – welcome to our world.

So as 2016 draws to a close (many are willing it to end) I turn my thoughts to face whatever will come in 2017.

I hope that it will be a more diverse, more equal and a more inclusive world


.

Wishing you all health, happiness, prosperity and peace